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  1. #1
    Angry Midget apstang50's Avatar
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    Brake fluid flush

    Ok guys, been awhile since I've posted. This weekend I'm changing front pads and rotors. I want to flush the fluid in the system, get all the old fluid out and get all new fresh fluid in. Whats the easiest way? I was thinking of either opening all the bleeders and letting them drip while I'm doing other stuff on the jeep. Or I have an air/vacuum bleeder that hooks to the bleeder and uses air/vacuum to pull the fluid though the system. Just looking for some input of what you guys think. Thanx.
    98 Platimum GC 5.9 Limited Flowmaster, relocated intake temp sensor, clear corners, 35% front tint, 5% sunroof tint, white face gauges, Accel coil, Summit Racing 8MM wires, 100w fog lights w/new housings, Mopar tow hooks, Mopar Performance PCM, Summit Racing drilled/slotted rotors w/ EBC pads, K&N FIPK

    SOLD 90 Mustang LX notchback: cobra intake, 70mm TB and spacer, fender mounted CAI, 1 3/4" long tube headers, 2 1/2" offroad h-pipe, 2 chamber flowmasters, 3.73s, subframe connecters, cobra r glass hood, glass decklid, 5-spd, cobra rims, underdrive pullys, e-fan, Steeda short through shifter


  2. #2
    RallyJeep GO
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    Gravity bleeding will take a LONG time. To truly flush the system, you have to push quite a bit of fluid through (around 2 quarts total). Usually about a quart through the right rear, then a few ounces from the left rear and close to a pint from each of the fronts before everything is flowing fresh looking fluid. It can be done with a 2 man bleed, but some sort of powered solution is easier / faster. A pressure bleeder that can just keep feeding fresh fluid would be ideal.
    1998 ZJ 5.9 Limited - Deep Slate
    Mods: Big trans cooler, 231 swap, Indy MA-X heads prepped by IMM, Comp 20-744-9 cam, 1.7 HS roller rockers, 52mm TB, Airgap manifold, DT headers and full 3" exhaust, SCT tune homebrewed by me, Martin Saine valve body, B&M tranny pan, magic suspension made from unicorn tears, power steering cooler, lots of lighting mods

  3. #3
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    As I understand (I've never done it), you don't want to let the reservoir run dry, so letting it drip out while you're doing other things is not a good idea. I've read it's difficult to get all the air out of the ABS hydraulic control unit without removing it and doing it upside down on a bench (or flip the jeep over)... could be a BOC though, but why test it?
    As long as you're using a compatible fluid, just go through the normal bleeding procedure until fluid comes out clear (less yellow) at each cylinder, and that will be a better flush than just dripping out because it won't leave any pooled in low spots.

    Vacuum bleeders suck, because if you don't have a tight fit they'll just suck air. Pressure bleeders are da bomb, but who has one?

    One time I was stuck doing a brake bleed alone, and my vacuum bleeder would not seal properly, so I took a stick the right length to wedge between the brake pedal and front of the driver seat, and used the power seat motor to compress and hold the pedal, while I ran back and opened and closed the bleeder valve, run back up, top off the fluid, back up the seat to release the pedal, repeat. Took longer than having a buddy available, but it worked like a charm, and I got my exercise in for the day running around the car.

    Remember always bleed from the cylinder farthest from the master to the closest (RR, LR, RF, LF).

  4. #4
    gte775i
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    Quote Originally Posted by carlmon View Post
    One time I was stuck doing a brake bleed alone, and my vacuum bleeder would not seal properly, so I took a stick the right length to wedge between the brake pedal and front of the driver seat, and used the power seat motor to compress and hold the pedal, while I ran back and opened and closed the bleeder valve, run back up, top off the fluid, back up the seat to release the pedal, repeat. Took longer than having a buddy available, but it worked like a charm, and I got my exercise in for the day running around the car.
    Absolutely brilliant. Good solution for checking your own brake lights too.. My only 'helper' is a two year old, so I'm always looking for nifty tricks like this. Thanks!

  5. #5
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    Glad it helped somebody! The power seat really makes a difference - it can actually apply quite a bit of pressure on the pedal, and of course makes the length of the stick a little less criticle.

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